USF Heart Institute


Dr. Christine Klemens

Congratulations to Dr. Klemens!

Dr. Christine Klemens was awarded a highly competitive K99 grant from the NIH NHLBI section to study the role of an understudied chloride transporter, ClC-6, in renal and vascular function during hypertension. These studies will provide further mechanistic insight to the role of this protein in blood pressure regulation in normotensive and pathological conditions. Dr. Klemens received her PhD from the University of Pittsburgh and was previously a postdoctoral fellow at the Medical College of Wisconsin. She is currently a Research Associate under the mentorship of Dr. Alexander Staruschenko, the current director of the Hypertension and Kidney Research Center, part of the USF School of Medicine Heart Institute. 


 

Congratulations to Dr. Wang!

Dr. DaZhi Wang was invited to give a seminar at the Stanford Cardiovascular Institute, Stanford University, on Jan 18, 2022. The title of his presentation was "Molecular Regulation of Cardiac Function, Regeneration and Disease." This archived talk is available for viewing here: https://med.stanford.edu/cvi/events/frontiers-in-cv-science/seminar-videos-2022.html.

Da-Zhi Wang

 

Congratulations to Dr. Breslin!

We would like to congratulate Dr. Jerome Breslin, who has been elected as President-Elect of the Microcirculatory Society. The link to the Microcirculatory Society’s website is listed here for reference: https://www.microcirc.org/ . Dr. Breslin will lead the Microcirculatory Society in its mission to “actively encourage and promote all forms of innovative research and teaching, leading to an increase in understanding of microcirculatory function in health and disease.” This is a prestigious honor and we are very proud to have Dr. Breslin on our team. Congratulations!


Featured Faculty

Da-Zhi Wang

Da-Zhi Wang, PhD

Professor, USF Health Heart Institute
Thomas McDonald, MD

Thomas McDonald, MD

Professor, USF Health Heart Institute

Stephen Liggett, MD

Stephen Liggett, MD

Vice Dean for Research, Morsani College of Medicine
Associate Vice President for Research, USF Health
Professor of Internal Medicine

Ganesh Halade, PhD

Ganesh Halade, PhD

Associate Professor, USF Health Heart Institute


Dr. Bibhu Mohanty - Tips on Heart Health
Dr. Bibhu Mohanty - Tips on Heart Health
Surface TAS2R14-WT expression with DPD treatment in HEK293T cells
Surface TAS2R14-WT expression with DPD treatment in HEK293T cells

Articles

Effects of elevation of ANP and its deficiency on cardiorenal function

Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), encoded by Nppa, is a vasodilatory hormone that promotes salt excretion. Genome-wide association studies identified Nppa as a causative factor of blood pressure development, and in humans, ANP levels were suggested as an indicator of salt sensitivity. This study aimed to provide insights into the effects of ANP on cardiorenal function in salt-sensitive hypertension.

New Insights Into the Molecular Underpinnings of LVNC

Maturation of the vertebrate heart requires transformation of the spongy, trabeculated heart wall into a thick, dense tissue that is called the compact myocardium. Interference with this transition leads to a myocardial defect known as left ventricular noncompaction (LVNC).
RIPK1 dephosphorylation and kinase activation by PPP1R3G/PP1γ promote apoptosis and necroptosis

RIPK1 dephosphorylation and kinase activation by PPP1R3G/PP1γ promote apoptosis and necroptosis

Receptor-interacting protein kinase 1 (RIPK1) is a key regulator of inflammation and cell death. Many sites on RIPK1, including serine 25, are phosphorylated to inhibit its kinase activity and cell death. How these inhibitory phosphorylation sites are dephosphorylated is poorly understood. Using a sensitized CRISPR whole-genome knockout screen, we discover that protein phosphatase 1 regulatory subunit 3G (PPP1R3G) is required for RIPK1-dependent apoptosis and type I necroptosis.
Phenotypic Variability in iPSC-Induced Cardiomyocytes and Cardiac Fibroblasts Carrying Diverse LMNA Mutations

Phenotypic Variability in iPSC-Induced Cardiomyocytes and Cardiac Fibroblasts Carrying Diverse LMNA Mutations

Mutations in the LMNA gene (encoding lamin A/C) are a significant cause of familial arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy. Although the penetrance is high, there is considerable phenotypic variability in disease onset, rate of progression, arrhythmias, and severity of myopathy. To begin to address whether this variability stems from specific LMNA mutation sites and types, we generated seven patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines with various LMNA mutations.

USF Health Institute News

6/22/2022
Although stroke is a leading killer, experts say it demands more attention and funding. On a Thursday night in mid-January, Dr. Rahul N. Mehra, a prominent Tampa psychiatrist, wasn’t feeling well and laid down on a couch in his south Tampa home. His wife Cathy was resting in the bedroom when she hea … [read more]
6/15/2022
The Florida Blue Health Knowledge Exchange, located in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine and Heart Institute features an interactive MultiTaction wall. When the new USF Health Morsani College of Medicine and Heart Institute opened in 2020 as a medical school of the future, it was equally im … [read more]
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