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CaralinaMarin De Evsikova

Caralina Marin De Evsikova, PhD

Assistant Professor, COLLEGE OF MEDICINE MOLECULAR MEDICINE
  • The early developmental environment plays a pivotal role in susceptibility to adulthood metabolic disease, such as obesity and diabetes. The long-term goal of this project is to understand how the maternal and embryonic environment alters gene expression, which ultimately leads to disease, via epigenetics. Epigenome of each individual is established during the egg-to-embryo transition, which is sensitive to teratogens, such as alcohol, bisphenol A, or dietary exposures. To identify the role of epigenetics in metabolic disease, I am using a naturally occurring “epigenetic barometer” allele (viable yellow) of the Agouti gene in mice, whose expression is controlled by methylation levels. Nutrigenomics & Healthspan. My long-term goal is to develop new mouse models of adult-onset metabolic diseases by monitoring in vivo physiology coupled with quantitative molecular genetics to detect genes and pathways involved with weight gain. This approach has been successful in identifying changes in eating, activity, and loss of circadian rhythms underlying “normal” weight fluctuations from across the lifespan.
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AmorceLima

Amorce Lima, MS

Postdoctoral Scholar Research, COLLEGE OF MEDICINE MOLECULAR MEDICINE
  • My research focuses on the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model to study Bartonella henselae infection and host response. B. henselae infection causes a wide range of symptoms ranging from the self-limiting Cat Scratch disease to a more severe Bacillary Angiomatosis seen primarily in immunocompromised individuals. BA is characterized by tumor-like lesions at the site of infection. Several virulence factors have been characterized in B. henselae and associated with Bartonella-induced pathogenesis. To date, there has not been a practical in vivo model to reproduce the characteristics of human infection with B. henselae. As a vertebrate, the zebrafish embryo model offers various characteristics, which make it a suitable model to study Bartonella infection and host response. They share similarities with the human immune system; their ex-utero development makes it much easier for genetic manipulation and their transparency at the embryo stage makes them very suitable for microscopic analysis.
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