Stalking

StalkingTypes of Stalking

  1. Intimate or former intimate stalking: the stalker and victim may be married or divorced, serious or casual sexual partners, or former sexual partners.
  2. Acquaintance stalking: the stalker and victim may know each other casually, either through formal or informal contact.
  3. Stranger stalking: the stalker and victim do not know each other at all. A new threat, cyberstalking 3: when internet, e-mail, or other electronic communications devices are used to stalk a victim, whose relationship to the stalker can be any of the above three scenarios.

Stalking Statistics

  • 2% - 4% of men and 8% -12% of women have been stalked sometime in their life.
  • 87% of stalkers are men.
  • 90% of stalking victims were stalked by just one person in their life.
  • Women are three times more likely to be stalked than raped, and are two times more likely to be physically assaulted than stalked.
  • There is no difference in stalking prevalence rates among white women and non-white women.
  • 81% of women stalked by a current or former intimate partner are also physically assaulted by that partner, and 31% are also sexually assaulted by that partner.
  • The average duration of stalking is 1.8 years, whereas with intimate partners, the average is 2.2 years.

Common Stalking Activities

  • 82% of female and 72% of male stalking victims reported that their stalker followed them, spied on them, or stood outside the home.
  • 61% of female and 42% of male stalking victims reported that their stalker made unwanted phone calls.
  • 33% of female and 27% of male stalking victims reported that their stalker sent or left unwanted letters or items.
  • 29% of female and 30% of male stalking victims reported that their stalker vandalized their property.
  • 9% of female and 6% of male stalking victims reported that their stalker killed or threatened to kill the family pet.

Impact

  • 26% of stalking victims lose time from work, 20-30% seek psychological counseling, and 56% of women victims take some type of self-protective measure, sometimes as drastic as relocating.
  • Anxiety, insomnia, social dysfunction, and severe depression is much higher in stalking victims than the general population, particularly if stalking involves being followed or having property destroyed.

References

  1. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Violence Against Women Grants Office (1998). Domestic violence and stalking. The third annual report to congress under the Violence Against Women Act. NCJ 172204 http://www.ojp.usdoj.gov/vawo/grants/stalk98/welcome.html
  2. Stalking Resource Center. Stalking Fact Sheet. (2003) http://www.ncvc.org/src/AGP.Net/Components/DocumentViewer/Download.aspxnz?DocumentID=38733
  3. U.S. Department of Justice, Office of Justice Programs, Violence Against Women Office. (2001). Stalking and Domestic Violence: Report To Congress. http://ncjrs.org/pdffiles1/ojp/186157.pdf