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SusanPross

Susan Pross, Ph.D.

Professor, College Of Medicine Molecular Medicine
  • In my role of Director of the Scholarly Concentrations Program I am involved in development and assessment of this elective opportunity for student scholarship and individuation.
  • I am a trained immunologist and microbiologist and did research in the field of immunology for many years. More recently, my focus has changed to education. As such I serve as a Course Director in Year 2 and Director of the Scholarly Concentrations Program (SCP). I am also involved in curriculum development and assessment. I have published and run workshops regarding educational issues and have helped mentor students on educational projects.
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AmorceLima

Amorce Lima, MS

Postdoctoral Scholar Research, College Of Medicine Molecular Medicine
  • My research focuses on the Zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryo model to study Bartonella henselae infection and host response. B. henselae infection causes a wide range of symptoms ranging from the self-limiting Cat Scratch disease to a more severe Bacillary Angiomatosis seen primarily in immunocompromised individuals. BA is characterized by tumor-like lesions at the site of infection. Several virulence factors have been characterized in B. henselae and associated with Bartonella-induced pathogenesis. To date, there has not been a practical in vivo model to reproduce the characteristics of human infection with B. henselae. As a vertebrate, the zebrafish embryo model offers various characteristics, which make it a suitable model to study Bartonella infection and host response. They share similarities with the human immune system; their ex-utero development makes it much easier for genetic manipulation and their transparency at the embryo stage makes them very suitable for microscopic analysis.
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JonathanSabbagh

Jonathan Sabbagh, PhD

College Of Medicine Molecular Medicine
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