USF Cardiology In The News



USF Health and Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery team up to expand cardiovascular education and research

The academic partnership with a preeminent heart transplant group will help position 

Tampa, FL (June 15, 2015) -The USF Health Morsani College of Medicine has launched an academic partnership with one of the top heart and lung transplant surgery groups in the country to expand the university's education and research opportunities in advanced cardiovascular care.

The affiliation comes at a time when interventional cardiology and cardiac surgery continue to merge as less invasive procedures for treating high-risk patients with heart disease.

Dr Caldeira, Dr Lockwood, Dr Libovitz FACT

L to R: Dr. Christiano Caldeira, president and CEO of Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery, with Dr. Charles Lockwood, USF Health senior vice president and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine, and Dr. Arthur Labovitz, chair of USF Cardiovascular Sciences, at the academic partnership agreement signing.

The alliance with Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery (FACT Surgery), led by Cleveland Clinic-trained cardiothoracic surgeon Christiano Caldeira, MD, represents the latest success for the college's Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, which has grown and strengthened under the leadership of cardiologist Arthur Labovitz, MD, department chair and co-director of the USF Health Heart Institute.

The partnership opens the door for USF to work closely with FACT Surgery to create accredited fellowships in cardiothoracic surgery and subspecialties such as heart and lung transplantation and heart surgery – training opportunities not available at the medical school.

FACT Surgery, a private cardiothoracic surgery group, specializes in treating patients with heart and lung failure. In a typical year, the surgeons perform more than 600 heart and lung surgeries. The four-member group practices primarily at Tampa General Hospital, which has the highest-volume heart transplant program in Florida according to the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network.

Dr Caldeira in TGH OR

Dr. Caldeira in one of the cardiac operating rooms at Tampa General Hospital — USF’s primary teaching hospital where the FACT Surgery group performs most of their more than 600 heart and lung surgeries a year.

"We're extremely pleased that such a pre-eminent group of cardiovascular surgeons will now be affiliated with us," said Charles J. Lockwood, MD, senior vice president of USF Health and dean of the Morsani College of Medicine.  "USF and Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery will build academic excellence in cardiothoracic surgery and related interventional cardiology specialties that capitalize upon nearby state-of-the-art resources at our primary teaching hospital Tampa General, at the Center for Advanced Medical Learning and Simulation (CAMLS) and at the Tampa Bay Research and Innovation Center."

Under the agreement, the FACT Surgery doctors will be appointed affiliate faculty members at USF so they can help train and supervise USF fellows, residents and medical students and conduct research and other scholarly activities.

USF Cardiology Faculty FACT

USF cardiology faculty and FACT Surgery surgeons meet for weekly conferences at TGH to decide on the best course of treatment for patients with advanced cardiovascular disease.

"At FACT Surgery, we always work to give patients the best care possible, to be on the cutting-edge of technology and to conduct clinical research – but we want the ability pass on our advanced knowledge and skills to the next generation of cardiothoracic specialists," said Dr. Caldeira, president and CEO of FACT Surgery and surgical director of the heart and lung transplant programs at TGH. "With this new collaboration USF cardiologists can learn from us and we can learn from them. It will make us both better.”

"The collaboration will help raise the level of care and improve health outcomes for patients with heart disease in the Tampa Bay region while positioning USF Health as a national leader in cardiovascular care," Dr. Labovitz said.

"This is the future of cardiovascular medicine," he added. "Ultimately, this academic partnership, adding top-level cardiothoracic surgery to USF’s existing expertise in cardiovascular medicine and interventional cardiology, will lead to optimal patient care."

Dr Labovitz and Dr Hooker FACT

USF Health cardiologist Dr. Arthur Labovitz, left, with Dr. Robert Hooker, one of the heart surgeons at Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery.

USF Health
USF Health’s mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician’s Group. The University of South Florida is a Top 50 research university in total research expenditures among both public and private institutions nationwide, according to the National Science Foundation.  For more information, visit www.health.usf.edu

Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery
Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery (F.A.C.T. Surgery) is committed to providing our patients and referring providers with the most clinically and technologically advanced cardio thoracic treatment for advanced cardiac and lung conditions. The physicians and support staff are committed to our patients by offering a dedicated, caring and compassionate environment that is intended to improve the quality of their lives and subsequently, their families.


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Media contacts:
Anne DeLotto Baier, USF Health Communications & Marketing
(813) 974-3303 or abaier@health.usf.edu

Michael E. Erhard, Executive Director, Florida Advanced Cardiothoracic Surgery
(813) 844-3228 or merhard@factsurgery.com





USF Health, Moffitt Cancer Center Launch Florida’s First Cardio-Oncology Program

New collaboration uses cutting-edge therapies to reduce risk of cardiovascular complications caused by cancer treatment

Approximately 30 percent of all cancer patients develop cardiovascular complications during treatment. USF Health and Moffitt Cancer Center are taking aim to reduce this risk by launching Florida’s first comprehensive academic Cardio-Oncology Program. The joint effort combines the expertise of cardiologists and oncologists to provide better care for cancer patients who have a history of cardiovascular disease or have developed cardiotoxic side effects from chemotherapy.

Cardio Oncology team 2015

Teaming up are, standing from left, Dr. Arthur Labovitz, Dr. Michael Alberts, Dr. Michael Fradley, Bernadette Shields, RN, cardio-oncology nurse coordinator at Moffitt, Dr. Roohi Ismail-Khan, and Larry Roy, administrator for the new Cardio-Oncology program.

“Cardiotoxicity is a common adverse effect of many cancer therapies. Anticancer drugs and radiation are designed to target and kill tumor cells, but there can also be collateral injury to other healthy tissues, such as the heart,” said Michael Fradley, MD, director of the new Cardio-Oncology Program and assistant professor of medicine in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine.

It can be challenging to distinguish cardiotoxic side effects from those related to the cancer treatment itself, such as fatigue and shortness of breath. Knowing if a patient has a pre-existing heart condition before treatment can help physicians decide the most effective course of therapy.

In addition, there are now more than 12 million cancer survivors living in the United States and many of these patients have been exposed to cardiotoxic therapies.  The cardiovascular effects may not become apparent for five to ten years after completion of cancer therapy.  This comprehensive program will also work to provide longitudinal care to cancer survivors in order to minimize long term complications.

Dr. Fradley will work with Roohi Ismail-Khan, MD, a medical oncologist with the Center for Women’s Oncology at Moffitt.

“This program will have a great impact on our patients. While cardiotoxicity can affect all cancer types, we often see the effects in breast cancer patients. For example, Herceptin is an effective targeted therapy for patients with HER2 positive metastatic breast cancer, but research shows the drug may also lead to cardiovascular complications,” said Dr. Ismail-Khan.

“Cardio-oncology is a relatively new area that is rapidly developing. There are only a few such programs in the country that aim to improve the quality of care in patients with two of the most common diseases, cancer and heart disease,” said Arthur Labovitz, MD, chair of the Department of Cardiology in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine. “Together, Moffitt and the USF Health Department of Cardiovascular Sciences will offer the latest and most comprehensive care available.”

Services offered by the new program will include:

  • Evaluation and management of patients with diagnoses of cardiovascular disease who are preparing for or are undergoing cancer treatment.
  • Treatment of patients who develop heart failure following treatments known to cause cardiac dysfunction, such as anthracyclines, Herceptin and radiation.
  • Assessment of the potential cardiovascular complications of new molecular-targeted cancer therapies, including arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy, cardiac ischemia and hypertension, with the goal of establishing tailored treatments for these complications.
  • Cardiovascular imaging including advanced 3D echocardiography systems to provide faster turnaround of results.
  • Preoperative cardiovascular evaluation for patients undergoing cancer surgery.

“This comprehensive approach of combining cardiologists and oncologists underscores Moffitt’s commitment to providing a multidisciplinary team approach to cancer care. Having a team of experts working together to develop and manage a patient’s treatment plan from the beginning gives our patients their best chance for beating cancer,” said W. Michael Alberts, MD, MBA, chief medical officer at Moffitt.

Cardio-Oncology Program patients will be seen at Moffitt, as well as the USF Health Morsani Center for Advanced Healthcare and USF Health South Tampa Center.  For more information, please call 813-745-2718.

 

About USF Health
USF Health’s mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician’s Group. USF Health is an integral part of the University of South Florida, a high-impact, global research university dedicated to student success. For more information, visit health.usf.edu.

About Moffitt Cancer Center

Located in Tampa, Moffitt is one of only 41 National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Centers, a distinction that recognizes Moffitt’s excellence in research, its contributions to clinical trials, prevention and cancer control. Moffitt is the top-ranked cancer hospital in Florida and has been listed in U.S. News & World Report as one of the “Best Hospitals” for cancer since 1999. With more than 4,500 employees, Moffitt has an economic impact on Florida of nearly $1.6 billion. For more information, visit MOFFITT.org, and follow the Moffitt momentum on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube.

Photo by Eric Younghans, USF Health Office of Communications. 

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USF Health to study whether medication will help patients with atrial fibrillation fare better after a stroke

The $2.2 million investigator-initiated clinical trial will compare a new rapid-onset anticoagulant with warfarin, the standard medical treatment for Afib.

Tampa, FL (Dec. 12, 2014) – The USF Health Morsani College of Medicine is conducting a clinical trial comparing the effectiveness of a new rapid-onset anticoagulant medication known as Apixaban with the standard anticoagulant drug warfarin in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation, the most common type of abnormal heart rhythm.

The investigator-initiated study is part of a $2.2 million research award from Bristol Myers Squibb awarded to Arthur Labovitz, MD, professor and chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences for the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine and director of Non-Invasive Cardiology at Tampa General Hospital.

USF Health cardiologist Dr. Arthur Labovitz,
principal investigator for the AREST study.

Dr. Labovitz is the principal investigator for the study, which is called “Apixaban for Early Prevention of Recurrent Embolic Stroke and Hemorrhagic Transformation,” or AREST. The study is the part of the USF Health Heart Institute, which is co-directed by Dr. Labovitz.

Anticoagulant therapy lowers the risk of strokes caused by embolisms (blood clots) in patients with atrial fibrillation, but its use is associated with potentially deadly bleeding. The new randomized trial will evaluate whether early treatment with Apixaban, an alternative requiring less monitoring and re-dosing than warfarin, can prevent recurrent strokes and reduce the risk of brain bleeding in patients who have suffered a first embolic stroke.

“Current guidelines suggest delaying treatment for patients with atrial fibrillation who have had a stroke, often times for two weeks or more,” Dr. Labovitz said. “This commonly results in poor outcomes in these individuals. The AREST study will more aggressively treat these patients earlier, sometimes within 24 hours of symptoms, in order to improve their outcomes. The protocol tests the hypothesis that one of the newer blood thinners, Apixaban (Eliquis), will be safe and effective in this regard.”

Early research showing that the risk of intracranial bleeding is markedly reduced (50 percent) with the new oral anticoagulant prompted him for initiate and develop the AREST study, Dr. Labovitz said.

In the USF AREST study, researchers will give either warfarin or Apixaban to 120 adult patients admitted to Tampa General Hospital with a transient ischemic attack (TIA) or small to medium ischemic stroke, who also have a history of, or current diagnosis of, atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is a common cause of stroke.

Patients will be randomly given the medications within 48 hours of stroke symptom onset and then followed for 180 days to compare the incidence of recurrent stroke, death or intracranial hemorrhage.

USF Health’s Dr. Scott Burgin
directs the TGH Comprehensive Stroke Center
and is a co-investigator for the AREST study.

“This study could answer a question that has long been undefined, and that is the optimal timing for giving anticoagulant medication after having an acute stroke,” said W. Scott Burgin, MD, professor of neurology and chief of the USF Cerebrovascular Division in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, director of the HFAP Certified Comprehensive Stroke Center at Tampa General Hospital, and a co-investigator for the AREST study.

“This new anticoagulant medication is already showing a greater effectiveness and a higher safety profile so starting the medication sooner than the standard 14 days could improve outcomes for stroke patients.”

Dr. Labovitz (left) and co-investigator Dr. David Rose stand in the heart of the Neurosciences Intensive Care Unit at TGH. The researchers will track stroke patients taking the new anticoagulant for the AREST study.

Co-Investigators for the USF AREST study, who are all USF Health faculty, are Dr. Burgin; David Rose, MD, assistant professor of Neurology and medical director, Neuro-ICU at TGH; Sanders Chae, MD, JD, assistant professor of cardiology; Michael Fradley, MD, assistant professor of cardiology; Theresa Beckie, PhD, professor in the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine and the USF College of Nursing; Waldo R. Guerrero, MD, assistant professor of vascular neurology; and Ryan Martin, MD, a fellow in the USF Department of Cardiovascular Sciences.

For more information about the AREST clinical trial at USF Health, please contact Bonnie Kirby, MSN, RN, research administrator for USF Cardiovascular Sciences, at bkirby@health.usf.edu or call (813) 259-8543.

About USF Health

USF Health’s mission is to envision and implement the future of health. It is the partnership of the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine, the College of Nursing, the College of Public Health, the College of Pharmacy, the School of Biomedical Sciences and the School of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Sciences; and the USF Physician’s Group. The University of South Florida is a Top 50 research university in total research expenditures among both public and private institutions nationwide, according to the National Science Foundation. For more information, visit www.health.usf.edu

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Faculty Spotlight: Arthur Labovitz, MD

Dr. Arthur Labovitz

Since joining the USF Health Morsani College of Medicine in 2011, Dr. Arthur Labovitz has been committed to raising the quality of cardiovascular care in the Tampa Bay region and beyond through leading-edge research.

Dr. Labovitz, Edward C. Wright Professor of Medicine and chair of the Department of Cardiovascular Sciences, co-directs the USF Health Heart Institute with Stephen B. Liggett, MD, vice dean for research at the college.

Recent investigator-initiated studies Dr. Labovitz helped bring to USF are just one example of his ongoing dedication to applying the science of cardiology to improve patient care.

In October he was awarded a $2.2 million grant by Bristol Myers Squibb to compare the effectiveness of a new rapid-onset anticoagulant medication known as Apixaban with the standard anticoagulant drug warfarin in stroke patients with atrial fibrillation. Anticoagulant therapy lowers the risk of strokes caused by embolisms (blood clots) in patients with atrial fibrillation, but its use is associated with potentially deadly bleeding. The new randomized trial will evaluate whether early treatment with Apixaban, an alternative requiring less monitoring and re-dosing than warfarin, can prevent recurrent strokes and reduce the risk of brain bleeding in patients who have suffered a first embolic stroke.

This summer, USF Health launched its first genomics trial with Dr. Labovitz as the principal investigator. Researchers will link the analysis of genetic information and medical histories of 1,000 consenting USF cardiology patients with the risk of developing various types of heart disease, stroke and other cardiovascular diseases. The database developed here may ultimately help advance personalized medicine — identifying optimal treatments based on an individual’s genetic makeup, and, equally important, sparing a patient from the trial and error of treatments that are unlikely to work, or may even cause harmful side effects.

While much evidence-based work remains to be done in cardiovascular medicine, Dr. Labovitz says he is encouraged by the research beginning to improve heart disease survival rates. “The statistics are wonderful to see. The death rate from heart disease in the United States has decreased 10 percent,” he said in a recent interview appearing in the blog Tampa Bay Heart. “We are making incredible strides with advances in cardiovascular prevention and treatment.”

Before joining USF Health, Dr. Labovitz was director of cardiology and led the cardiovascular fellowship programs at Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Mo. Recognized as a leader in the field, he is a past president of the National Board of Echocardiography and a board member of the American Heart Association. He serves on the editorial boards of several journals, including the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography (JASE), and as an editorial consultant for numerous others, including the New England Journal of Medicine. He has published more than 300 scientific articles and book chapters.

His areas of expertise include cardiovascular imaging, valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation and anti-thrombotics, diastolic heart failure, transesophageal echocardiography and stroke.

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USF Health Heart Institute Breaks Ground


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